Category: Fiction

Our Furry Friends #4

Cake & Quill is a collective that publishes themed fiction anthologies and donates the proceeds to a charity related to the theme. Paws and Claws, to be set loose on the world on April 1, has an animals theme and includes two stories and some haiku by yours truly. Proceeds will go to Bob’s House for Dogs, which provides hospice care for dogs and readies senior dogs for adoption, among other good works. This post features my essay on pets from my past.

Review of: SuperGuy

SuperGuy by Kurt Clopton (Not a Pipe Publishing, 2017)

SuperGuy eBook CoverAt heart, SuperGuy is a workplace comedy, albeit one that takes hilarious advantage of every superhero cliché in the toolbox. The story opens with the hero already in dire, ridiculous peril, then makes use of an extended flashback to convey SuperGuy’s origin story. And what a story it is, a workplace comedy in its own right. Through the alliances, petty rivalries and small-scale power struggles in the offices of city government, overeducated but unemployable intern Oliver Olson accidentally becomes SuperGuy when the mayor decides to fill a budgeted hero position in order to secure re-election. As a real if low-budget and modestly-powered (but not modestly-costumed) hero, Oliver has to quickly adjust to his new position, which has its own set of rules, alliances and rivalries. While still

Kurt Clopton
Kurt Clopton

learning what his powers are and how to control them, SuperGuy is forced into conflict with a bona fide supervillain, a brainiac with plans for world domination . . . and a serious crush on a diner waitress. I won’t give away how SuperGuy gets out of that opening peril, but the stage appears to be set for the next exciting episode.

I received an advance copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Available for preorder March 12, 2017:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Review of: Going Green

going-green-ebook-coverGoing Green by Heather S. Ransom (Not a Pipe Publishing, 2017)

This appealing young-adult novel begins in the shallow end, with high school girls giggling and squealing about the latest development in protagonist Calyssa’s life. From there, it dives deep into issues of class privilege, inequality, and genetic modification in a high-tech post-post-apocalyptic future where the chosen elite get to “go Green.” Calyssa is near the beginning of this process, which enhances humans with modified chloroplasts so they can make energy from sunlight, water and air, freeing up the time that would be spent finding, preparing, and eating food. Green citizens are supposed to use this time making the world a better place, while non-Greens do the necessary grunt work to support them. Meanwhile, anti-GMO rebels are attacking experimental crops outside the safe enclave of SciCity.

Although Calyssa has sympathy for the poor, deprived non-Greens, she believes the party line that those who aren’t chosen

heather-s-ransom-photo
Heather S. Ransom

must be less intelligent, less deserving than Greens. A sudden change in Spring Break plans puts her in the home of a friend whose non-Green farming family reveals a side of the class divide she’d never considered. A week with these kind, down-to-earth folk changes her mind about a lot of things—including her friend’s handsome, intelligent brother Gabe. Can love between Green and non-Green survive as tensions heat up between extremists on both sides? The book ends before we find out, but an epilogue hints at sequels yet to come.

I received an advance copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

This book will release March 21, 2017 and is now on preorder:

Amazon

Powells

Barnes & Noble