Square Pig in a Round Hole-January 16, 2021

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #44

It helps me in these uneasy, transitional times to recall that my politics were shaped by Walt Kelly’s Pogo comic strip, which made equal-opportunity fun of all parties but came down particularly hard on authoritarians and bullies. The swamp critters (a community of anthropomorphized alligators, bears, beavers, groundhogs, opossums, owls, rabbits, raccoons, skunks, turtles, and more) came together every four years to throw Pogo Possum’s hat into the ring (against his will, sometimes with him still in it). If asked, I Go Pogo, and offer here a Pogo-themed assortment of band names. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

Acapulco Lips
(February 2, 2013) On the page, it looks like silly nonsense, but has to be read aloud to really sink in. On top of the wordplay (for me, at least), it brings to mind Walt Kelly’s Pogo strip, in which “Octawocktapockers done got Albert!”

Alabaster
(October 5, 2013) I don’t know what they were intending, but as a Pogo fan of long standing, I can’t help thinking of Albert Alligator’s adorable little nephew Alabaster, and his pal Rackety Coon Chile. And so I smile.

Lumphead
(January 21, 2017) A truly Pogoesque insult or endearment.

Puddle City Opossums
(December 28, 2013) This has both downhome folksiness and good poetic/syllabic structure. As an old Pogo fan, I’m happy to honor these possums. Puddle City is an excellent Seattle nickname, too.

Trampled By Turtles
(September 8, 2012) I love this image, because of the slow speed. Anything heavy enough to do any damage, you could just roll out of the way. I picture some poor dude, passed out and engulfed by turtles.

Two last things before you go:

  1. My new thing in the new year is The Rage Brigade, a Facebook group for conversation about fantasy, science fiction, superheroes, and music (and the intersections thereof). If that sounds like fun, come join us here.
  2. I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first nine issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-January 9, 2021

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #43

Well, that was a week. Had a kind of 2020 vibe to it, didn’t it? I scrapped my originally planned theme and went with something maybe a little more suitable. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, try not to start a civil war, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

The Almost Faithful
(August 22, 2015) This implies that fidelity is on a scale, with “only cheated a little bit” and “almost faithful” on the line from unfaithful to faithful. Or perhaps this is the congregation that makes it as far as the church door but not quite all the way inside.

Expired Logic
(June 13, 2015) Ways of thinking that used to work are no longer valid. It’s time for fresh ideas! (I also like their expressed genre, sci-fi punk!)

Head for the Hills
(November 12, 2016) There’s a temptation to run and hide, but where would we go? This is our circus; those are our monkeys.

Shot on Site
(June 13, 2015) Here we have a tidy little pun that alludes to knee-jerk violence and location camera work in three short words.

somesurprises
(August 22, 2015) It showed up in the paper as two words, but I like it even better run together, all lowercase. Unusual enough to be some surprise without overwhelming the senses. It creeps up.

Two last things before you go:

  1. My new thing in the new year is The Rage Brigade, a Facebook group for conversation about fantasy, science fiction, superheroes, and music (and the intersections thereof). If that sounds like fun, come join us here.

  2. I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first nine issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-January 2, 2021

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #42

New Year Greetings! I’m leery of wishing a “happy” new year after 2020, but I will offer a hope that this year is better than the last one. It’s also the Ninth Day of Christmas, and the celebration continues with more festive holiday-themed band names. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

Glacier Veins
(December 12, 2015) Not exactly festive, but ice and cold are seasonal (some years). You’d have to have glacier veins not to be moved by the tale of the gentle bender, or perhaps by a sentimental old carol.

Hans Gruber and the Die Hards
(January 18, 2020) Gotta respect a band that uses classic X and the Y structure to refer to a pop culture icon in a different medium. Yippee ki yay and Merry Christmas.

Sacred Signs
(December 19, 2015) The carol “Love Came Down at Christmas” includes this puzzling line: “Worship we our Jesus: But wherewith for sacred sign?” I’ve never really understood what Christina Rossetti meant by that, but it’s always a line I look forward to singing because when else do I get to say “wherewith”?

season of strangers 
(December 12, 2015) My husband was sure the sentimental old carol “Dear Little Stranger” was a favorite beloved of all. So far, we haven’t found anyone else who knows it, including me. But this is the season to welcome strangers who can’t find room at the inn.

Several Other Ghosts
(January 11, 2020) Too late to visit Scrooge on Christmas Eve, they find themselves at loose ends, available for hauntings, weddings, bar mitzvahs, and children’s parties.

 

One last thing before you go: I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first eight issues and subscribe here for future issues–the next one comes out next week! (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-December 26, 2020

Images shows a square cartoon pig in a round hole.

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #41

It’s the Second Day of Christmas, and the gift I have for you is better than turtledoves or partridges in pear trees. It’s a stocking full of festive holiday-themed band names, with a bonus sixth name because we all deserve a treat. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

Chris Mess
(November 17, 2012) Funny how you don’t see anyone starting a movement to put the mess back in Christmas.

Common Holly
(December 14, 2019) Pretty, Christmas-y, invasive, functionally immortal. (Not a seasonal act, either, but well timed.)

Deer Leader
(December 12, 2015) It looks like a cute play on what they call North Korea’s supreme leader. It’s actually about Rudolph.

The Donner Vixens
(December 24, 2011) Christmas-y, yet of questionable taste in so many ways! (Insert your own cannibal joke here.) I heard this week that if Santa’s reindeer are as usually portrayed, with full antlers in mid-winter, they’re all female. So I really hope this is a girl group.

Electric NoNo
(December 12, 2015) A warning to pet owners: be sure to keep your cats, dogs, hamsters, wombats, etc. from chewing on the tree lights!

Gentle Bender
(December 12, 2015) This one makes a neat turn from beloved animal star to a lonely Christmas Eve, listening to Darlene Love and drinking toasts to absent friends until you quietly pass out under the tree.

One last thing before you go: I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first eight issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-December 19, 2020

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #40

This afternoon, I’m taking part in Jolabokaflod 2020 (Christmas Book Flood), on a panel titled “Writing YA in a World of Identity, Sexuality, and Violence: How Much Is Too Much?” Watch the livestream at 1:30 p.m. Pacific here (or watch it later at your leisure). There is a whole playlist at the link of other panels and presentations happening today and tomorrow. I hope you’ll check it out!

Meanwhile, I have a few Rocky and Bullwinkle themed band names left, plus a few that comment on the weather we’re expecting this weekend.  As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.


Buckets of Rain
Downpour
(April 9, 2011) Considering our recent weather, Downpour and Buckets of Rain obviously go together as well as fulfilling the local flavor criterion.

Dies Drear
(January 21, 2012) This is perfect for Seattle in winter: not Dies Irae (Day of Wrath), but Dies Drear (Day of Low Clouds with Chance of Rain or Rain/Snow Mix and Dark by 5:00 P.M.). The aural pun secures it a place on the list.

Moose Almighty
(January 20, 2019) Evokes Bullwinkle, and is also a better clean swear than the movie title it’s based on.

Moose Light Kingdom
(April 16, 2016) I doubt I have ever passed up a band name with “moose” in it. In this case, I imagine the Man in the Moon has been replaced by Bullwinkle.

Moose Portrait
(September 23, 2012) I think I saw this on Facebook last week. I wondered, “Where is squirrel?”

One last thing before you go: I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first eight issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-December 12, 2020

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #39

“A thunder of jets, an open sky, a streak of gray and a cheerful ‘Hi!’
A loop, a whirl, a vertical climb, and once again you’ll know it’s time for …”

Here at Square Pig HQ, our weekend movie nights almost always begin with an episode of The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends, of which we own three seasons. Moose and squirrel are a big part of our family culture, so it seems appropriate to choose a Rocky and Bullwinkle theme for the blog. There aren’t quite as many fitting band names as there were for the October moon and November literary themes, but still more than enough. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

Boy & Bear
(October 25, 2014) My first thought is of Christopher Robin and Pooh. My second thought is of Moose and Squirrel. I like the simplicity of the monosyllables related by alliteration, and the innocence of the image.

Chin Up Rocky
(December 22, 2012) Hokey-smoke! A Bullwinkle reference!

DJ Doo Right
(June 11, 2011) I’m picturing a square-jawed DJ in a Mountie uniform . . .

Elk and Boar
(January 15, 2011) I suppose this has something to do with wild animals or game meat, but the construction evokes “Moose and Squirrel.” Anything that makes me think of Rocky and Bullwinkle is OK by me.

Fearless Lieder
(September 15, 2012) Any band that can combine references to German art song and Rocky and Bullwinkle gets my vote. I see this and I hear Boris Badenov saying it. “That voice! Where have I heard that voice?”

One last thing before you go: I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first eight issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-December 5, 2020

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #38

I ended National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) with almost 27,000 words of a new fantasy novel. That’s far from 50K, so I didn’t “win.” But since my goal was only to end up with a sloppy draft I could make good, I feel like a winner, anyway. My previous projects have or will soon be published, so this one has a good chance.

There were enough literary themed band names left for one more week, including a bonus sixth name. Next week I’ll choose an exciting new theme. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, maybe read a book or ten, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

Salinger
(January 8, 2011) I re-read Catcher in the Rye last week, so I couldn’t very well leave this band out. There’s a lot of rock & roll attitude in the book.

Squirrel of Shame
(September 8, 2012) Years ago, I read The Children of Odin to my kids. One of my favorite figures was Ratatosk, the Squirrel of Discord that runs up and down the World Ash Tree. I’m guessing this is his brother.

Starsailor
(June 6, 2015) This one hits both my literary and science buttons. My fascination with space travel began with Apollo 11 and only increased once I learned to read and discovered science fiction. It wasn’t until I studied a little Greek in college that I learned what a beautiful, poetic, dare I say romantic name NASA chose for U.S. space travelers. Astronaut literally means “star sailor.”

Tequila Mockingbird Orchestra
(May 26, 2012) I like names like this that don’t come into their own until you say them aloud, and then suddenly there’s a literary allusion smacking you in the face.

Terraform
(January 8, 2011) It’s hard to pass up a good sci-fi connection. I think I’ve mentioned before that I came to rock music and science fiction at around the same time, and I’m still into both. This name particularly strikes me now because I’m writing a piece that involves terraforming and had to learn about it recently. [Guess what? I’m working on that book again.]

Told Slant
(May 28, 2016) Where was this one when I did the literary theme a couple of weeks ago? Never mind, here they are now, having taken Emily Dickinson’s advice re: truthtelling.

One last thing before you go: I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first eight issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-November 28, 2020

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #37

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is almost over–I’ve got about 26,000 words on a lively and engaging wizard fantasy that I look forward to developing further. In other literary news, my flash-fiction ghost story, “She Kept the House,” will be included in an anthology of 100 stories by 100 authors, titled Worth 1000 Words. The already-successful Kickstarter to fund the project goes for 4 more days, offering flash fiction lovers the chance to pre-order the book and get some bonus swag.

The literary theme on the blog will continue for two weeks, there are just that many goodies. I’m even including a couple of bonus names this week. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, maybe read a book or ten, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

Mandroid Echostar
(May 14, 2016) Now we enter the realm of pulp sci-fi. I imagine this character was Buzz Lightyear’s delinquent roommate at the Space Ranger Academy who dropped out and became a smuggler or spaceman of fortune.

Marley’s Ghost 
(May 14, 2016) Identical in structure to Casca’s Dagger [featured earlier this month] but referring to a character rather than a prop — the first of four spirits intent on Scrooge’s redemption. If it were up to me, Marley would get promoted to Heaven for this act.

Peace Mercutio
(January 1, 2011) I’m just a sucker for a good literary allusion.

Pickwick
Trespassers William
(December 18, 2010) These two both get the nod for literary allusions to a couple of favorite books. Music and books go together like books and music.

The Pro-nouns
(April 4, 2015) Is this name standing in for the actual name of this band? The hyphen suggests nouns that have given up their amateur status. (This also reminds me of two siblings who swapped genders; I suggested they start a band called Pronoun Trouble. They have yet to take me up on it.)

The Raven and the Writing Desk
(April 26, 2014) Classic X and the Y structure meets literary reference! The English majors go wild.

One last thing before you go: I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first eight issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-November 21, 2020

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #36

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) continues–I’ve got over 22,000 words on my project so far and have reached the end of the story…but not of the writing. There are still many holes to plug and complications to add. The literary theme on the blog goes on, too–there are so many suitable band names in the vault, I’m including a couple of bonus names this week. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, maybe read a book or ten, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

DJ Leopold Bloom
(April 2, 2011) I love it when literature insinuates itself into pop culture. I hope he has a gig on June 16.

Don and the Quixotes
(March 3, 2012) Classic band name format + literary allusion = a real winner.

Fan Fiction
(January 22, 2011) Sometimes the names reveal rock music’s geeky heart. As a writer and nerd myself, I respect and applaud anyone willing to fly their nerd flag high.

Flyleaf
(March 7, 2015) Literary in a literal and very particular way.

Hello Nowhere
(April 4, 2015) This belongs with one of my favorite lines in children’s literature, “Good night, nobody,” found on an unillustrated page in the classic Good Night, Moon. Or else it’s what you say when you stare into the abyss and invite it to stare back.

In the Whale 
(May 14, 2016) Where Ahab’s leg resides.

Keep of Kalessin
(May 14, 2011) Do these guys know me? I am a fantasy writer because of Ursula LeGuin’s Earthsea series, and Kalessin is my favorite dragon in all of literature. I will probably never write a dragon story because it couldn’t possibly measure up. This was the easiest pick this week (and also a perfect badass name for a metal band).

One last thing before you go: I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first eight issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)

Square Pig in a Round Hole-November 14, 2020

Naming a band is an act of concentrated creative expression. Square Pig in a Round Hole exists to reward five favorite band names each week. Winners are (usually) listed alphabetically.

Selection is wholly unscientific and subject to whim, with a bias toward wordplay, humor, and local flavor. In most cases, I won’t know anything about the bands at the time of selection. Thanks to the Seattle Times nightlife listings for abundant source material!

(Until live music returns, I am curating retrospective posts from past material. Dates indicate when the band was originally featured.)

SQUARE PIG IN A ROUND HOLE PANDEMIC EDITION #35

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) continues–I’ve got 16,000 words on my project so far and still having fun–and so does the literary theme on the blog. There are more than enough suitable band names in the vault for the whole month. As ever, wash your hands, wear your mask, maybe read a book or ten, and if you are able, please buy these bands’ music and merch while we wait for a better day.

Casca’s Dagger
(May 14, 2016) One character’s prop suggests the whole tragedy.

Comedy of Terrors
(April 4, 2015) The simple addition of one letter takes you from Shakespearean farce to B-movie horror; so bad it’s funny.

The Copyrights
(June 6, 2015) It’s a literary reference — not to the creative, inspiring, romantic side, but to the boring, bureaucratic end of things. When you set an uninteresting function off by itself as a band name, it lights up!

Dante Vs. Zombies
(September 8, 2012) This sounds like one of those literature + monsters mash-ups. My money’s on Dante, because he’s got Virgil and the virtuous pagans backing him up. (That would be a good name for a band, too.)

Deadly Poets
(October 4, 2014) I knew I distrusted poetry for some reason…

One last thing before you go: I share highlights from this blog in my quarterly author newsletter, The Storypunk Report, as well as news of what I’m writing and reading, upcoming events, and other goodies, including “Wizard in the Mosh Pit,” an exclusive short story just for subscribers. Click the link to check out the first eight issues and subscribe here for future issues. (Or just follow the blog for your weekly dose of band names.)